Tag Archives: Galavant

Galavant…ing Around Quality

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The eight episode first season run of Galavant on ABC has only just ended, though with the promise of more to come. For four weeks, Sunday nights had an hour dedicated to a “musical comedy extravaganza.” At least, that’s what the commercials said. The reality is different. For every joke that landed, three missed. For every catchy song that could be hummed for days, there was another that just had to be suffered for the sake of getting through the show. The plot was formulaic and predictable, but that isn’t to say that it was unenjoyable; in fact, it was often amusing watching it play out. The real high point to the show, though, is the cast and the way that the actors portray the characters. The show even brought in a series of well-known guest stars to augment the regular players. While the cast and characters are the main reasons to sit down and watch the show, let’s take a look at the highs and lows that one should consider before watching Galavant.

 

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The first thing to consider in any “musical comedy” is the music. The show’s theme song, which is used with different words throughout the first episode and at the start and end of each week’s pair of episodes, is powerful and fun. It was a great way to start the series, and it’s the type of song that hooks viewers up front. Unfortunately, it also creates an expectation for the rest of the series that is never met. No other song in the season stands out nearly so much. There are others that are good, but when stacked up against how the show opens, they simply aren’t that memorable. Normally at this point, a list of what songs are good versus what songs are bad would follow, but Galavant throws a curve ball into that aspect of reviewing: the song styles vary. From doo-wop to drinking song to traditional Broadway number, there is no predominant song type. As such, opinions on which songs are the best are based on the tastes of the individual. The show does a good job of covering genres, so there is something for everyone. But the wide variety also means that everyone will have songs they greatly dislike as well.

 

 

A similar thing can be said about the comedy. It tries too hard to cover too many types of comedy, and so it both amuses and disappoints in turn. By far the weakest attempts at humor were the ones predicated on situational irony, mostly because the show was too easy to predict. If the audience knows what’s about to happen, there’s no laugh to be had when it does happen. Anachronistic jokes often fell just as flat; one character spends minutes trying to convince others that the idea for a zipper is a great plan, while his companions mock the thought. Having said all that, there are a number of one-liners and sarcastic asides in each episode that do hit home. The show may be inconsistent in its comedy, but when every line is intended as a joke, getting a laugh for even a quarter of them still makes for a decently funny show.

 

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With the music and the comedy out of the way, let’s look at the “extravaganza” part of the show, the plot and the characters. The show starts as a classic tale of an evil king kidnapping a fair maiden and a gallant knight riding to rescue his true love. Then the opening song ends and every part of that last sentence gets thrown out the window. Madalena (Mallory Jansen), the damsel in distress turns out to be quite a distressing damsel, choosing money and power over love and generally making hell the lives of everyone else in the show. The evil King Richard (Timothy Omundson) turns out to be a pushover and a wuss who only wants to be liked, even if he has to invade neighboring kingdoms to accomplish that mission. And the brave knight Sir Galavant (Joshua Sasse), the titular character, falls into a year-long depression, trading all his fighting skills and his sense of self-worth for kegs of ale, despite the efforts of his loyal squire Sid (Luke Youngblood).

 

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Sid the Squire (Youngblood) and Sir Galavant (Sasse)

 

The show picks up a year later when a beautiful princess named Isabella Maria Lucia Elisabetta of Valencia (Karen David) comes seeking the mighty hero Sir Galavant to help her reclaim her kingdom from King Richard. Richard had conquered the land in order to find the fabled Jewel of Valencia, which he believed could buy him Madalena’s love. Isabella enlists Galavant’s help by lying to him, telling him that Richard had beaten Madalena and that Madalena longed for Galavant. Richard knew this story would draw Galavant to the castle so that he could be executed, and he threatened the lives of Isabella’s parents in order to motivate her to tell it.

 

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Luke Youngblood, Mallory Jansen, Joshua Sasse, Timothy Omundson, Vinnie Jones and Karen David

 

While Galavant, Isabella and Sid travel toward the castle and the waiting trap, Richard realizes that Madalena doesn’t respect him and never will until he proves he can be a strong person and a strong leader. He enlists the help of those around him – his personal bodyguard, his personal chef and the jester that his wife is openly cheating with – to teach him how to be a better man, though these efforts prove fruitless. Madalena, realizing that she wants power and wealth without the burden of Richard, becomes the evil bitch she feels she was always meant to be, orchestrating layers and layers of plots designed to leave her the sole ruler. The three stories finally converge at the castle, and the season finale leaves the audience less hanging from a cliff than rolling down a mildly sloping hill. It clearly sets up for a second season and leaves many dangling threads, but there is no impending doom or danger for any of the characters.

 

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The plot is fairly predictable throughout, but it is heavily driven by the interactions of the various characters, and the actors do a wonderful job bringing them to life. They are over the top caricatures, they fit standard tropes and they are deeply flawed, and these qualities make them a pleasure to watch. The three-story structure also allows a lot of guest stars entry into the show, whether as a wizard named Xanax whom Richard visits to help him relax (Ricky Gervais) or as a rival knight whose go-to response is “Yo mama” (John Stamos) or as a monk who has taken a vow of singing (Weird Al Yankovic). These quirky side characters add a lot to the show, and the audience’s excitement over their inclusion can help to cover up the somewhat haphazard storylines that incorporate them.

 

Weird Al Yankovic and Ricky Gervais in Galavant

Weird Al Yankovic and Ricky Gervais in Galavant

 

Overall, it’s not a bad show, but it’s not the great show it was touted to be. The first episode was fun and set up the story well, and the second was a good follow up. The excitement and novelty of the idea dies down near the beginning of episode three, but by then there is a sense of investment in seeing the characters through the remaining episodes. At that point, the remainder of the season is short enough that it ends before it gets to be too much to slog through to finish the story. In the end, it’s a fun waste of a few hours, and a few songs and jokes might stand out, but don’t expect too much from it.

Galavant just ended its first season on ABC and is now available for streaming on Hulu. It was created by Dan Fogelman and stars Joshua Sasse, Timothy Omundson, Vinnie Jones, Mallory Jansen, Karen David and Luke Youngblood.

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