Tag Archives: President Obama

The Political Thriller of the Year

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Tuesday night saw part six of a seven part miniseries that airs only one episode each year. The show was heavily plot laden with compelling characters – including antagonists who utilized the power of sitting still and silently as their primary weapons and the country’s favorite quirky sidekick, who forgot to unbutton his jacket while he was sitting. While the story was a bit meandering and had been heavily spoiled by previews in the weeks leading up to the air date, it had some humor and plenty of moments that will be discussed and argued about around water coolers for the remainder of the week. With the leading protagonist played by President Barack Obama, it’s time to discuss the 2015 State of the Union Address.

 

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The United States Constitution requires that the President “from time to time” report to Congress on the state of the union. This requirement has turned into one of the largest political events of the year, a set opportunity for the President to address a joint session of Congress and the American people at the same time. During the speech, the President discusses how things are going in the country – politically, socially, economically – and he lays out his vision of what can and should be done in the next year. Applause and standing ovations interrupt the speech every minute or so, at least from those in favor of whatever statement the President has just made. Many of the more partisan ideas touted by the President will result in half of the room standing to clap while those in the other half vie for the title of “Most Disgruntled-Looking.” Since seating is, for the most part, unassigned, Republicans and Democrats rarely intermingle in their seat choices, resulting in a clear line down the center of the room that divides the aisles. General procedure now explained, let’s move on to the specifics of tonight’s show.

 

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President Obama’s speech did not contain any surprising elements, particularly given that the White House has spent the past weeks talking about what to expect from the address. Topics of note included: free tuition to community college for those willing to work for it; closing the Guantanamo Bay detention camp; raising taxes on the rich so as to ease the burden on middle-class families; reforming immigration; closing loopholes in the tax code; opening relations with Cuba; raising the minimum wage; defeating ISIL and terrorists worldwide; focusing on infrastructure development; continuing economic policies that have brought the country out of recession; climate change and energy alternatives; and the need for bipartisanship. One particularly high note in the speech was President Obama’s call for more civil dialogue and elevated debate between the parties. While the sentiment is truly meritorious, it might have had greater impact if it came in a speech that did not so often subtly (and occasionally overtly) insult Republican leadership and positions.

 

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Every word said in the speech is going to be parsed and rehashed in the next few weeks by pundits from both sides, but what deserves mention is the showmanship of the night, by both sides. President Obama is a powerful speaker, and he knows how to stir an audience. His speechwriters wrote a strong speech, and they knew what points needed to be hit to resonate with the American people. More than that, though, the speechwriters knew how to frame the points that Republicans were most likely to attack during their rebuttal. The Democratic members of Congress got an exhaustive workout during the evening, based on how often they were standing and sitting. The Republicans, on the other hand, had all individually found that one comfortable position in their chairs, and they were determined not to lose it. Even during scenes that focused on the President during periods of applause, the reactions of the separate parties could be judged based on the behavior of Vice-President Joe Biden and Speaker of the House John Boehner, both of whom sat behind the President. The points where Speaker Boehner did not clap or was reluctant to clap will give Republicans across the country a clear idea on the points they should argue with their Democratic coworkers in the morning. His lack of hand movement also suggests that many of the projects proposed tonight by President Obama are not going to pass the Republican-controlled Congress.

 

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The Republican response was delivered this year by Senator Joni Ernst from Iowa. She told stories about growing up poor, having to make it to where she is through hard work and determination. She spoke about her time in the military to highlight how important the defense of America is, and how important it is to stop ISIL. She spoke of the tragedy of the terrorist attack in Paris. And she did it all without emotion or intonation. The problem that Senator Ernst ran into was that her response was pre-written. She was clearly reading lines that had been worked and molded over a series of weeks, but that failed to actually respond to any points raised during the President’s address. The show would have been much improved if the party spokesman had been given talking points instead of a script and had been able to attend the event so that points from the address could be brought up and rebutted. While her military background and the fact that she’s a young, female, Republican Senator may have made her an appealing choice to represent a party that is often seen as being filled with only old white men, she was not the impressive speaker that the Republicans needed to counter the highly charismatic President Obama. Senator Ernst did as she was asked by her party, a noble endeavor, but she was simply not the right person for the job.

 

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Senator Joni Ernst giving the Republican Response to the 2015 State of the Union Address. Full transcript can be found here: http://nydn.us/1yJegRU

 

President Obama has one more State of the Union address to give, one that will help set the tone of the 2016 election year. He will be working with a Republican Congress for the rest of his presidency, which has caused many to already declare him a ‘lame duck.’ However, he is still trying to serve the citizens of the United States as best he can. On January 21, 2015 – the day after his 2015 State of the Union address – he is digitally hosting what is known as “Big Block of Cheese Day,” a chance for citizens to talk to White House staffers about issues that impact them, to ask questions and to give feedback about the state of the union from outside the capital.

 

 

The importance of the State of the Union address has been in question of late, but it is hard to deny the show quality of the event. Anyone who likes political dramas such as House of Cards, West Wing or even Scandal would enjoy the political intrigue at play. Those who don’t enjoy such shows will still find it entertaining and enlightening, and it may impact your vision of the country and its leaders. But, above all else, it is good television.

The 2015 State of the Union Address starred President Barack Obama, Vice-President Joe Biden, Speaker of the House John Boehner and Senator Joni Ernst and can be found in full on YouTube, and likely many other news websites as well. The full script will be posted online in coming days. The next episode will air live in early 2016 on every broadcast network and every cable news channel.

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