Tag Archives: TV

Daredevil: Marvel’s Own Dark Knight

Netflix Now Streaming

 

Netflix and Marvel are teaming up to bring four new superhero shows to viewers, showcasing characters that are not as popular in the comics pantheon. The first of these shows, Daredevil, saw its digital premier this weekend, with all 13 episodes in the first season releasing at once. One 13-hour binge watching session later, it’s clear that this is a good show. Good, but not great. It has a lot of action, a lot of fighting and a lot of fantastic stunts, but it also spends a lot of time standing around talking. For this, the source material is to blame: Daredevil simply isn’t that exciting of a superhero. By day he’s a lawyer and by night he’s a vigilante who is simply human, with all the vulnerabilities that anyone else would have. Still, if you liked Christopher Nolan’s Dark Knight trilogy, this is a show that you’ll enjoy – only the names were really changed.

 

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Matt Murdock, the main character, was struck blind in an accident as a child. He pushed a man out of the way of an incoming truck, and then got dowsed in the hazardous chemicals that the truck was carrying. These chemicals may have blinded him, but they also enhanced his other senses. As a result, he became incredibly sensitive to the smallest sounds, changes in air currents, the slightest fluctuations in temperature and the like. He developed a way to see the world around him without seeing it.

 

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His father was an amateur boxer who was in on a scheme to rig fights, and he would often lose intentionally as a way to earn extra cash. After Matt’s accident, his father decides he wants to be a hero to his son for once, and wins a fight he was supposed to lose. The men rigging the fight lose a lot of money because of it, and have him killed, orphaning Matt. While at the orphanage, Matt meets a man called “Stick” who is also blind and who teaches him how to utilize his remaining senses as a fighting technique. Matt eventually becomes a lawyer and returns to where he grew up, the Hell’s Kitchen area of New York. He begins patrolling in the night, using his super hearing to listen for crimes in progress that he can stop. While he starts with petty crime, he soon ends up involved in a battle for the entirety of Hell’s Kitchen, thanks to a case he gets hired onto in the course of his day job. The Russian, Chinese and Japanese mafias are all working together under the leadership of a man named Wilson Fisk – known in the comics as Daredevil’s greatest adversary, “Kingpin” – and Matt is determined to keep his home safe.

 

Vincent D'Onofrio as Wilson Fisk, aka Kingpin

Vincent D’Onofrio as Wilson Fisk, aka Kingpin

 

The show does a good job of balancing Matt’s nighttime activities with his daytime life, as well as the lives of his friends and allies. His law partner and best friend Foggy Nelson, along with their secretary Karen Page and journalist Ben Urich, spend their days working to take down Kingpin using the legal system, not knowing that Matt is spending his nights working outside of the system to accomplish the same goal. At the same time, the show also gives viewers an in-depth look at Kingpin himself. It looks at his background being abused by his father, explores his motivations behind attempting to take over the area (spoilers: his motives are actually noble, though his methods are underhanded), and it even shows his warmth in dealing with those he loves. In many ways, Kingpin comes off as a more believable and likable character than the titular hero.

 

Matt Murdock, Karen Page, Ben Urich and Foggy Nelson

Matt Murdock, Karen Page, Ben Urich and Foggy Nelson

 

Normally, when a show has this many moving parts, it’s hard to keep all of the plates in the air at once. Daredevil manages to keep them aloft by not overreaching with any of them. The characters are not one dimensional by any means, but most do stop at two dimensions. This problem is likely due to the limited number of episodes, and will be corrected with a second season. The plot mostly revolves around the characters finding some new piece of information and then hiding from or getting roughed up by Kingpin’s men until that information can be put to use while Daredevil is either beating up gang members or getting beaten up badly himself. The show does shine during the action sequences, though, and anyone who is a fan of watching acrobatic fighting maneuvers as one man takes out an entire army of gang members will love this show for that. It just begins to feel formulaic and repetitive after a while.

 

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The show is being praised by many for being darker and grittier than anything else in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, and it is at that. It is the first Marvel product to get a Mature rating on television. This fits with the tenor of the comics; Daredevil is more of an antihero akin to Punisher or Batman than he is a hero like the MCU has given audiences so far. This is a trend that is likely to continue in the upcoming Netflix/Marvel shows, as Jessica Jones has a rather dark history, as does Luke Cage. However, just because it is dark and gritty and mature does not mean that it is a great show. That’s not to say it’s bad, and it is, in fact, a good series. However, it is being overhyped due to its realism as stacked next to other Marvel properties, and that is praise it simply does not deserve.

 

Luke Cage, Iron Fist, Daredevil and Jessica Jones, coming soon to Netflix as the Defenders

Luke Cage, Iron Fist, Daredevil and Jessica Jones, coming soon to Netflix as the Defenders

 

I recommend Daredevil to anyone who likes the Dark Knight trilogy because that is the mental comparison I made throughout every episode. I recommend it for those who like shows based on comics, particularly if you plan to watch the other upcoming Netflix/Marvel shows leading up to the Defenders miniseries. I recommend it for anyone who just likes to watch action and violence. I do not recommend it for anyone who doesn’t like these things or who is just looking for a new crime procedural or cop drama. This is so much more and so much less than that.

 

Daredevil is a Netflix original series that began streaming on April 10, 2015. It stars Charlie Cox, Deborah Ann Woll, Elden Henson, Vondie Curtis-Hall and Vincent D’Onofrio.

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A Sadly Broken Show

Netflix Now Streaming

 

Netflix’s latest original series, The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, began streaming this weekend, a new comedy produced by Tina Fey. Given Tina Fey’s normal comedy genius, this show is a huge disappointment. In the entire 13-episode first season, there were no laugh out loud moments that stick in the mind. The premise of the show is original, the main character – played by Ellie Kemper – is well-written, bright and strong, and some (but distinctly not all) of the supporting roles are entertaining. But, despite that, this remains a comedy that fails to bring the funny. Let’s take a closer look.

 

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The premise of the show is a novel one that lends itself to a great story: four women are rescued from an underground bunker where they spent the last 15 years believing that they were the only survivors of the Apocalypse, saved by a doomsday preacher/cult leader. Kimmy Schmidt, the main and titular character, is one of those four women, dubbed the “Mole Women of Indiana.” She was the youngest of the group, kidnapped by the cult leader when she was only in the eighth grade. While the other three women choose to go back to their lives and homes in Indiana, Kimmy decides that she does not want to go back to Indiana, where she’ll only be seen as one of the Mole Women, but wants to make a new start for herself somewhere that she won’t be known. She moves to New York City, unaware of any of the major technological, linguistic, historical and cultural events of the last 15 years, and so must learn how to make her way in a world she doesn’t comprehend, with a childlike naïveté regarding everything about 2015 and without even a middle school education.

 

The Mole Women of Indiana

The Mole Women of Indiana

 

Kimmy is a great character, optimistic hard-working, with a great amount of inner (and outer) strength. She was able to resist the brainwashing of the cult leader, she refuses to leave New York even after a slew of bad luck ends with her losing her job and $13,000 dollars in the same day, and she even manages to rally those around her into bettering themselves, to varying degrees of success. Kimmy inspires her GED study group to band together to pass the class, holds together the Mole Women both in and out of the bomb shelter they had lived in, and helps her wealthy boss Jacqueline Voorhees (Jane Krakowski) cope with a divorce that leaves her with only a paltry twelve million dollars. Kimmy is a well-developed character, and the plots surrounding her are what make the show watchable. The storylines around the other characters, however, are of a far lower quality.

 

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When Kimmy first arrives in New York, she answers an ad in a newspaper regarding a place to live. The landlord – played by Carol Kane – placed the ad so that she could find a roommate for her favorite tenant; she doesn’t want to evict him, but he won’t pay rent, so she insists that he get a paying roommate. The landlord is a kook who gets some personal development, but doesn’t receive much time in the overall plot. Her character mostly seems to be wrapped up in the single word “kook.” Her tenant is an unfortunate walking stereotype named Titus Andromedon. Many of the jokes in the show are either originated by him or revolve around him in some way, which explains why the funny is missing. He is a poorly written and poorly developed character whose absence could only improve the show. His only redeeming quality is his singing voice which, while beautiful, is implemented into episodes with terrible timing.

 

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The parts of Kimmy’s life that aren’t flashbacks or spent at home or with members of her study group revolve around her job, nanny for Mrs. Voorhees’ two spoiled rich kids. Or rather, that’s supposed to be her job, but she becomes more of a caretaker for Jacqueline herself. Kimmy helps Jacqueline gather up the courage to begin divorcing her husband after Jacqueline discovers he’s been cheating on her. Jane Krakowski may be in danger of getting typecast for the “rich, narcissistic woman” role, since she plays almost the same character that she played on 30 Rock, though her backstory in this show is quite different. It is shown, via flashbacks, that blonde-haired, blue-eyed Jacqueline is actually Native American, but decided that she wanted to be a part of white culture, where she could marry rich and live the high life. The ridiculousness was probably meant to be funny, but the show again missed its mark.

 

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The show had a number of big names as guest stars, including John Hamm, Nick Kroll and even Tina Fey herself. However, their characters were lackluster and uninspired. The show quickly gets to a point where any scene without Kimmy is to be dreaded, and even the scenes that she’s in she sometimes can’t save for the poor execution and writing of the other characters.

 

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There is little that can redeem a comedy that has no laugh factor. The story premise is original, and the main character is a powerful positive force in the show’s favor, enough so that she makes the show nearly worth watching. But a dismal cast of supporting characters who tell boring and easily-forgotten jokes brings the show crashing down. The show had two seasons ordered by Netflix from the start, so there will be more episodes in the future. Hopefully they can make improvements in the next season.

The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt is a Netflix original series. It is produced by Tina Fey and stars Ellie Kemper, Tituss Burgess, Carol Kane and Jane Krakowski.

Galavant…ing Around Quality

Hulu Now Streaming

 

The eight episode first season run of Galavant on ABC has only just ended, though with the promise of more to come. For four weeks, Sunday nights had an hour dedicated to a “musical comedy extravaganza.” At least, that’s what the commercials said. The reality is different. For every joke that landed, three missed. For every catchy song that could be hummed for days, there was another that just had to be suffered for the sake of getting through the show. The plot was formulaic and predictable, but that isn’t to say that it was unenjoyable; in fact, it was often amusing watching it play out. The real high point to the show, though, is the cast and the way that the actors portray the characters. The show even brought in a series of well-known guest stars to augment the regular players. While the cast and characters are the main reasons to sit down and watch the show, let’s take a look at the highs and lows that one should consider before watching Galavant.

 

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The first thing to consider in any “musical comedy” is the music. The show’s theme song, which is used with different words throughout the first episode and at the start and end of each week’s pair of episodes, is powerful and fun. It was a great way to start the series, and it’s the type of song that hooks viewers up front. Unfortunately, it also creates an expectation for the rest of the series that is never met. No other song in the season stands out nearly so much. There are others that are good, but when stacked up against how the show opens, they simply aren’t that memorable. Normally at this point, a list of what songs are good versus what songs are bad would follow, but Galavant throws a curve ball into that aspect of reviewing: the song styles vary. From doo-wop to drinking song to traditional Broadway number, there is no predominant song type. As such, opinions on which songs are the best are based on the tastes of the individual. The show does a good job of covering genres, so there is something for everyone. But the wide variety also means that everyone will have songs they greatly dislike as well.

 

 

A similar thing can be said about the comedy. It tries too hard to cover too many types of comedy, and so it both amuses and disappoints in turn. By far the weakest attempts at humor were the ones predicated on situational irony, mostly because the show was too easy to predict. If the audience knows what’s about to happen, there’s no laugh to be had when it does happen. Anachronistic jokes often fell just as flat; one character spends minutes trying to convince others that the idea for a zipper is a great plan, while his companions mock the thought. Having said all that, there are a number of one-liners and sarcastic asides in each episode that do hit home. The show may be inconsistent in its comedy, but when every line is intended as a joke, getting a laugh for even a quarter of them still makes for a decently funny show.

 

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With the music and the comedy out of the way, let’s look at the “extravaganza” part of the show, the plot and the characters. The show starts as a classic tale of an evil king kidnapping a fair maiden and a gallant knight riding to rescue his true love. Then the opening song ends and every part of that last sentence gets thrown out the window. Madalena (Mallory Jansen), the damsel in distress turns out to be quite a distressing damsel, choosing money and power over love and generally making hell the lives of everyone else in the show. The evil King Richard (Timothy Omundson) turns out to be a pushover and a wuss who only wants to be liked, even if he has to invade neighboring kingdoms to accomplish that mission. And the brave knight Sir Galavant (Joshua Sasse), the titular character, falls into a year-long depression, trading all his fighting skills and his sense of self-worth for kegs of ale, despite the efforts of his loyal squire Sid (Luke Youngblood).

 

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Sid the Squire (Youngblood) and Sir Galavant (Sasse)

 

The show picks up a year later when a beautiful princess named Isabella Maria Lucia Elisabetta of Valencia (Karen David) comes seeking the mighty hero Sir Galavant to help her reclaim her kingdom from King Richard. Richard had conquered the land in order to find the fabled Jewel of Valencia, which he believed could buy him Madalena’s love. Isabella enlists Galavant’s help by lying to him, telling him that Richard had beaten Madalena and that Madalena longed for Galavant. Richard knew this story would draw Galavant to the castle so that he could be executed, and he threatened the lives of Isabella’s parents in order to motivate her to tell it.

 

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Luke Youngblood, Mallory Jansen, Joshua Sasse, Timothy Omundson, Vinnie Jones and Karen David

 

While Galavant, Isabella and Sid travel toward the castle and the waiting trap, Richard realizes that Madalena doesn’t respect him and never will until he proves he can be a strong person and a strong leader. He enlists the help of those around him – his personal bodyguard, his personal chef and the jester that his wife is openly cheating with – to teach him how to be a better man, though these efforts prove fruitless. Madalena, realizing that she wants power and wealth without the burden of Richard, becomes the evil bitch she feels she was always meant to be, orchestrating layers and layers of plots designed to leave her the sole ruler. The three stories finally converge at the castle, and the season finale leaves the audience less hanging from a cliff than rolling down a mildly sloping hill. It clearly sets up for a second season and leaves many dangling threads, but there is no impending doom or danger for any of the characters.

 

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The plot is fairly predictable throughout, but it is heavily driven by the interactions of the various characters, and the actors do a wonderful job bringing them to life. They are over the top caricatures, they fit standard tropes and they are deeply flawed, and these qualities make them a pleasure to watch. The three-story structure also allows a lot of guest stars entry into the show, whether as a wizard named Xanax whom Richard visits to help him relax (Ricky Gervais) or as a rival knight whose go-to response is “Yo mama” (John Stamos) or as a monk who has taken a vow of singing (Weird Al Yankovic). These quirky side characters add a lot to the show, and the audience’s excitement over their inclusion can help to cover up the somewhat haphazard storylines that incorporate them.

 

Weird Al Yankovic and Ricky Gervais in Galavant

Weird Al Yankovic and Ricky Gervais in Galavant

 

Overall, it’s not a bad show, but it’s not the great show it was touted to be. The first episode was fun and set up the story well, and the second was a good follow up. The excitement and novelty of the idea dies down near the beginning of episode three, but by then there is a sense of investment in seeing the characters through the remaining episodes. At that point, the remainder of the season is short enough that it ends before it gets to be too much to slog through to finish the story. In the end, it’s a fun waste of a few hours, and a few songs and jokes might stand out, but don’t expect too much from it.

Galavant just ended its first season on ABC and is now available for streaming on Hulu. It was created by Dan Fogelman and stars Joshua Sasse, Timothy Omundson, Vinnie Jones, Mallory Jansen, Karen David and Luke Youngblood.

The Political Thriller of the Year

Youtube Now Streaming

 

Tuesday night saw part six of a seven part miniseries that airs only one episode each year. The show was heavily plot laden with compelling characters – including antagonists who utilized the power of sitting still and silently as their primary weapons and the country’s favorite quirky sidekick, who forgot to unbutton his jacket while he was sitting. While the story was a bit meandering and had been heavily spoiled by previews in the weeks leading up to the air date, it had some humor and plenty of moments that will be discussed and argued about around water coolers for the remainder of the week. With the leading protagonist played by President Barack Obama, it’s time to discuss the 2015 State of the Union Address.

 

State of the Union Logo

 

The United States Constitution requires that the President “from time to time” report to Congress on the state of the union. This requirement has turned into one of the largest political events of the year, a set opportunity for the President to address a joint session of Congress and the American people at the same time. During the speech, the President discusses how things are going in the country – politically, socially, economically – and he lays out his vision of what can and should be done in the next year. Applause and standing ovations interrupt the speech every minute or so, at least from those in favor of whatever statement the President has just made. Many of the more partisan ideas touted by the President will result in half of the room standing to clap while those in the other half vie for the title of “Most Disgruntled-Looking.” Since seating is, for the most part, unassigned, Republicans and Democrats rarely intermingle in their seat choices, resulting in a clear line down the center of the room that divides the aisles. General procedure now explained, let’s move on to the specifics of tonight’s show.

 

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President Obama’s speech did not contain any surprising elements, particularly given that the White House has spent the past weeks talking about what to expect from the address. Topics of note included: free tuition to community college for those willing to work for it; closing the Guantanamo Bay detention camp; raising taxes on the rich so as to ease the burden on middle-class families; reforming immigration; closing loopholes in the tax code; opening relations with Cuba; raising the minimum wage; defeating ISIL and terrorists worldwide; focusing on infrastructure development; continuing economic policies that have brought the country out of recession; climate change and energy alternatives; and the need for bipartisanship. One particularly high note in the speech was President Obama’s call for more civil dialogue and elevated debate between the parties. While the sentiment is truly meritorious, it might have had greater impact if it came in a speech that did not so often subtly (and occasionally overtly) insult Republican leadership and positions.

 

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Every word said in the speech is going to be parsed and rehashed in the next few weeks by pundits from both sides, but what deserves mention is the showmanship of the night, by both sides. President Obama is a powerful speaker, and he knows how to stir an audience. His speechwriters wrote a strong speech, and they knew what points needed to be hit to resonate with the American people. More than that, though, the speechwriters knew how to frame the points that Republicans were most likely to attack during their rebuttal. The Democratic members of Congress got an exhaustive workout during the evening, based on how often they were standing and sitting. The Republicans, on the other hand, had all individually found that one comfortable position in their chairs, and they were determined not to lose it. Even during scenes that focused on the President during periods of applause, the reactions of the separate parties could be judged based on the behavior of Vice-President Joe Biden and Speaker of the House John Boehner, both of whom sat behind the President. The points where Speaker Boehner did not clap or was reluctant to clap will give Republicans across the country a clear idea on the points they should argue with their Democratic coworkers in the morning. His lack of hand movement also suggests that many of the projects proposed tonight by President Obama are not going to pass the Republican-controlled Congress.

 

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The Republican response was delivered this year by Senator Joni Ernst from Iowa. She told stories about growing up poor, having to make it to where she is through hard work and determination. She spoke about her time in the military to highlight how important the defense of America is, and how important it is to stop ISIL. She spoke of the tragedy of the terrorist attack in Paris. And she did it all without emotion or intonation. The problem that Senator Ernst ran into was that her response was pre-written. She was clearly reading lines that had been worked and molded over a series of weeks, but that failed to actually respond to any points raised during the President’s address. The show would have been much improved if the party spokesman had been given talking points instead of a script and had been able to attend the event so that points from the address could be brought up and rebutted. While her military background and the fact that she’s a young, female, Republican Senator may have made her an appealing choice to represent a party that is often seen as being filled with only old white men, she was not the impressive speaker that the Republicans needed to counter the highly charismatic President Obama. Senator Ernst did as she was asked by her party, a noble endeavor, but she was simply not the right person for the job.

 

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Senator Joni Ernst giving the Republican Response to the 2015 State of the Union Address. Full transcript can be found here: http://nydn.us/1yJegRU

 

President Obama has one more State of the Union address to give, one that will help set the tone of the 2016 election year. He will be working with a Republican Congress for the rest of his presidency, which has caused many to already declare him a ‘lame duck.’ However, he is still trying to serve the citizens of the United States as best he can. On January 21, 2015 – the day after his 2015 State of the Union address – he is digitally hosting what is known as “Big Block of Cheese Day,” a chance for citizens to talk to White House staffers about issues that impact them, to ask questions and to give feedback about the state of the union from outside the capital.

 

 

The importance of the State of the Union address has been in question of late, but it is hard to deny the show quality of the event. Anyone who likes political dramas such as House of Cards, West Wing or even Scandal would enjoy the political intrigue at play. Those who don’t enjoy such shows will still find it entertaining and enlightening, and it may impact your vision of the country and its leaders. But, above all else, it is good television.

The 2015 State of the Union Address starred President Barack Obama, Vice-President Joe Biden, Speaker of the House John Boehner and Senator Joni Ernst and can be found in full on YouTube, and likely many other news websites as well. The full script will be posted online in coming days. The next episode will air live in early 2016 on every broadcast network and every cable news channel.

The Simpsons Serves Up a Stinker

Fox Now Airing

While many people are talking about the recently aired Simpsons episode penned by Judd Apatow, let’s take a moment to look back at the midseason premier episode. In 26 seasons of any show, there are bound to be a few episodes that drop the ball, but “The Man Who Came To Be Dinner” was one of the worst in a long time. For a show that has always been an industry leader in terms of storytelling (there’s a whole South Park episode dedicated to things that The Simpsons did first), airing an episode like this one that substitutes disjointed jokes that are past their prime in place of a character driven plot is disappointing at best. Spoilers, such as they are, for the episode follow.

The Simpsons has followed a fairly regular pattern in recent years. The first few minutes are joke heavy, leading into a setup for the “meat” of the episode. The plot heavy middle has fewer jokes that are laugh-out-loud funny, but they are wittier and more likely to make viewers think for a second. The end generally goes for either heartwarming or a solid ending joke. “The Man Who Came To Be Dinner” tried hard to follow this pattern, but it forgot the funny start, it forgot to stick the ending, and there is less“meat” in the middle than there is in a Krusty Burger.

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The reason that most of the jokes didn’t measure up is that they seemed both dated and recycled. It almost seemed like the episode wanted to be a clip show, given how many references there were to older episodes. The beginning segment featured a family vacation to “Diznee Land,” a parody park that first appeared in season two. The kids were doing an “Are we there yet?” routine that was funnier in the first few seasons than in the 26th. When they finally get to the park, what follows is a series of jokes that have been made about Disneyland since 1955. The lines are too long. The prices are too high. Bag checks are tedious. It’s too hot. Everything is merchandized and given a kitschy name. The most unique joke came in the mockery of the “It’s A Small World” ride, where the song threatens Bart’s life if he tried to leave the ride. That was the only joke that elicited a laugh in the entire episode.

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The middle of the episode begins when the Simpson family finds a new ride that no one else is on titled “Rocket to Your Doom.” The ride is a trap set by Kang and Kodos, who are making a rare appearance outside the Treehouse of Horror episodes (which Homer notes, saying, “But this isn’t Halloween!”) As the family hurtles towards Rigel Seven, two more famous jokes from past episodes get rehashed. Homer opens a bag of chips in zero-gravity, which leads him to try floating around to catch them, like he did during his time as an astronaut. However, Bart and Maggie continually beat him to the chips, a callback to the episode where Santa’s Little Helper has puppies that like to eat Homer’s chips before he can enjoy them. It actually gets obnoxious how many times Homer’s famous catchphrase of “d’oh” is used in this 30 second joke.

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Once they arrive on Rigel Seven, and after a series of ill-conceived and ill-executed bodily function jokes (Rigelians give birth, then seconds later, those birthed give birth, and so on, but there seems to be an ending point after four continuous births? Their river is made from the drool of the dead, but the dead are dumped in halfway down the river?), the Simpsons are put on display in a zoo. A Rigelian with a doctorate in humanology comes to make sure they are comfortable, mistaking many aspects of human culture and biology. When Lilo and Stitch scoops you on a joke, don’t use that joke.

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The humanologist tells them that one of them is going to be ceremonially eaten, and Homer is, unsurprisingly, chosen. Homer is on stage to be eaten when a teleport tube materializes around him (and gets stuck, in a gag that has been used on the show more times than can be counted). He is rescued by rebel Rigelians, peace-loving hippies who just want to learn about earth’s achievements and party. They offer him a way back home, but Homer won’t leave his family on the (literal) chopping block. He returns to the ceremony just in time to join his family in being eaten, but a section of his ass poisons the Rigelian queen when she eats it. The family is released (after Kang tells them that everyone should forget this happened), and spends the end segment mimicking the original Star Trek.

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Having Kang remove this episode from canon may have been intended to excuse the disjointed nature, an attempt to say that this was just meant to be whimsical, not a serious episode. But most of the episodes aren’t serious, and almost never does anything carry from one episode to the next (except character deaths outside of the Treehouse of Horror episodes). Expanding the background of the Rigelians, particularly Kang and Kodos, could be a great story. In each of the 25 Treehouse of Horror episodes, the viewers have gotten to learn a little more about our favorite aliens. Spreading the stories out, focusing on them once each season, has worked. That’s more time and focus than most of the hundreds of Simpsons characters get in a season. This episode was not necessary, not engaging, and not funny; yet, it still pulled in the highest ratings of the night. The ability to win ratings should not leave writers complacent and willing to put a half-assed episode into circulation.

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I am not holding this episode up as an example of declining quality in the show as a whole. One bad episode does not denote a pattern. However, this episode was just that: bad. Lazy writing and old and boring jokes combined to make an episode that should not have aired. “The Man Who Came To Be Dinner” leaves a bad taste in the mouths of viewers, who hope the rest of the season will wash away this bitter pill.

The Simpsons was created by Matt Groening, stars Dan Castellaneta, Julie Kavner, Nancy Cartwright, Yeardley Smith, Hank Azaria and Harry Shearer and airs Sunday nights at 8/7c on Fox.

How to Make Today a Great Day

Netflix Now Streaming

With 104 days at your disposal, what sort of adventures and activities could you come up with to keep busy? For most of us, work or tv or books or video games would consume our time, cementing us to our couches and chairs. We wouldn’t take advantage of all the adventure and excitement that the world holds. The Disney X D show Phineas and Ferb explores this idea of making the most of each and every day, turning 104 days of sitting in front of a screen into 104 days of exploration and imagination. With three seasons and a full-length movie on Netflix, anyone can and should spend time watching how these creative kids spend their time.

 

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Before delving too deeply into this review, I should point out that, yes, this is a cartoon, and one originally aimed at kids. However, Disney is masterful at making cartoons for kids that appeal to adults too. The company knows that the parents are going to be dragged into watching whatever the kids are watching, so small jokes and references are added into most Disney cartoons. Phineas and Ferb takes that to an even higher level. Many of the jokes are ones that kids would never get without explanation, ones that adults will find uproariously funny. So, even if you think that cartoons are for kids, and that you won’t enjoy the show, give it a chance. You may find the show funnier than you imagined. Each episode of Phineas and Ferb follows a pretty standard formula. Without commercials, the runtime of each episode is around 23 minutes, broken into two parts. Sometimes a storyline will take the whole 23 minutes, but most episodes have the two separate stories. Within each story, there are three intermingling plots.

 

Ferb and Phineas with friends Isabella, Buford and Baljeet

Ferb and Phineas with friends Isabella, Buford and Baljeet

 

The first revolves around the titular characters, Phineas Flynn and Ferb Fletcher, step-brothers who are inventive and mechanical geniuses. The pair are not content with just sitting lazily around, they have to be building something new or else they get stir-crazy. These inventions often defy logic, explanation and physics. The science of the world seems to bend itself backwards in order to accommodate the brothers. Also included in their story for the episode are their three closest friends, a bully named Buford, a nerd named Baljeet and Isabella, the leader of the local Fireside Girls troop (think Girl Scouts meet Navy SEALS).

 

Linda and Candace Flynn

Linda and Candace Flynn

 

The next story involves their older sister, Candace Flynn, and their mother, Linda Flynn-Fletcher. Candace is spending her summer caught between trying to “bust” her brothers to their mom – her version of tattling and getting them in trouble – and trying to pursue the boy she likes. Linda tries to keep her daily life going despite all the interruptions by her daughter, and she never manages to see the crazy contraptions that her sons build, much to Candace’s dismay. Over time, Candace begins to believe that there’s a mysterious force at work that is plotting against her, ensuring that their mother never sees what the boys are building. More often than not, though, it’s just the work of an evil scientist fighting his nemesis.

 

Perry the Platypus and Dr. Heinz Doofenshmirtz

Perry the Platypus and Dr. Heinz Doofenshmirtz

 

The third plot line centers on the family’s pet platypus, Perry. While it’s weird enough for a family to have a pet platypus, this particular platypus also happens to be a secret agent named Agent P working for a group known as OWACA – the Organization Without A Cool Acronym. OWACA utilizes unusually smart and strong animal agents to combat evil; though the animals are talented, they cannot speak – they are just animals, after all. Perry the Platypus spends his days fighting Dr. Heinz Doofenshmirtz, an inept evil scientist scheming to take over the Tri-State Area. Dr. Doofenshmirtz has a new device – which he calls an “inator” (as in “forgetinator” or “turn everything evil-inator”) – that complements whatever painful backstory he has in mind that day. The fight between Perry and Dr. Doofenshmirtz follows roughly the same formula each episode: Dr. Doofenshmirtz traps Perry in an overly elaborate trap, gives his backstory monologue, begins to activate his machine (which invariably causes whatever the boys are doing to escape the notice of their mother), and then Perry escapes, blows up the machine (and Dr. Doofenshmirtz at the same time) and flies back home, where he resumes his secret identity.

In the course of these three interwoven stories, there is always at least one musical number. The music is original to the episode, and the songs are often catchy enough that you’ll find yourself humming them days later (one of the most popular songs can be found below). Disney even released a cd of the top songs from the first season, well worth a listen. The songs are usually either funny or touching, sometimes both, and the stellar vocal cast that the show has gathered performs them to perfection. In fact, the musical numbers have earned the show four Emmy nominations, an impressive feat for an animated show.

 

 

One of the best features of this show that separates it from other cartoons is how it deals with the characters. Most cartoons – especially ones aimed toward children – will give the main character some sort of flaw that lasts for exactly one episode, and that they must overcome in order to beat the bad guy and resolve the story. Phineas and Ferb doesn’t do that. The characters have remained fairly stable since the beginning. Major changes in character are due to long-term story arc changes or due to outside forces such as one of Dr. Doofenshmirtz’s devices, not some personal failing that suddenly surfaced just in time for the character to learn some important lesson.

The language used in the show is a key factor in its appeal to adults. Now, by that, I don’t mean to suggest that the cartoon kids are doing their versions of the “Seven words you can’t say on tv.” Rather, the show does not talk down to the audience, either the kids or the adults. In fact, at times the show’s use of words may be beyond what a child could handle. Words such as sesquipedalian, techno-mimetic and septuagenarian have all appeared in just the last few episodes that I re-watched. The show managed to work them in seamlessly, too. Sesquipedalian is not an easy word to use in a punchline, but Phineas and Ferb found a way.

 

Final shot of the musical episode "Rollercoaster: The Musical!"

Final shot of the musical episode “Rollercoaster: The Musical!”

 

No show is perfect, though this one comes close. Apart from the pains of waiting for more episodes to go up on Netflix and the suspense of whether the show will continue to run, the only downside is in comparison to itself. The show has some phenomenal episodes, including two episodes that featured Disney’s recently acquired properties Star Wars and Marvel Comics. While there are no truly bad episodes of the show, some are weaker than others. This is mainly noticeable if you watch multiple episodes back-to-back in marathon style, though it can also be seen in the first few episodes of the series, while the show was still working to set itself up. Fortunately, there’s no real over-arching plot, so you can skip the early episodes and come back to them once you’re a devoted fan of the show.

 

The Phineas and Ferb/Marvel crossover event titled Mission: Marvel

The Phineas and Ferb/Marvel crossover event titled Mission: Marvel

 

Overall, I rank this in my favorite shows, so I recommend it to anyone of any age. I was introduced to the show by my 40-year-old high school physics teacher and my 22-year-old (at the time) best friend, independently of each other. I was resistant at first, thinking it to be a show for kids, and then laughed my way through the whole series. Multiple times. I’m even re-watching it as I write this review. There’s a lot of humor that will resonate with people of all ages. Give the show a try; watch two episodes, and if you’re not in love with it by then, you don’t have to watch any more. But I’m willing to bet you’ll be singing along to the theme song as you make the choice to start the third episode.

Phineas and Ferb is written by Dan Povenmire and Jeff “Swampy” Marsh and airs on Disney and Disney X D. Three seasons and the movie are available to stream on Netflix Instant.

God, the Devil and John

NBC Now Airing

With the winter hiatus upon us and a lack of new episodes until mid-January at the earliest, now seems like a good time to take a look back at one of this season’s newest gems. Constantine premiered late in the season in the timeslot vacated for Hannibal’s season break. NBC didn’t stray far in swapping out the two shows – they’re comparable in terms of blood, mystery and number of gnawed on humans. Production on Constantine’s inaugural season halted after only four episodes had aired. However, right around the time of the fifth episode, things started picking up. Viewership increased, ratings went up and the plot began to truly resonate with the audience. Unfortunately, because the show hit its stride after the decision was made to halt production, we may only get to see the 13 episodes already made before this show is gone. That is, unless it picks up more in ratings and viewership. So, here’s why your date night on Friday, January 16th should involve a date with your couch and an NBC show about a British detective… who hunts demons.

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Constantine – based on DC Comics’ Hellblazer series – centers on supernatural detective John Constantine and his companions as they fight the often referenced “rising darkness.” John’s core support team is his seemingly immortal friend Chas Chandler and the clairvoyant mystery woman Zed Martin, both of whom appear in the original comics in some form. Heaven’s support of the team arrives in the form of an angel named Manny, whose cryptic clues often frustrate John onto the correct path. How can a show get more interesting than when it has a spellcasting detective, a psychic, an immortal and an angel fighting evil? You add in a haunting backstory, powerful and threatening villains, and easter egg allusions to other DC properties.

Harold Perrineau, Matt Ryan, Angélica Celaya and Charles Halford as Manny, John Constantine, Zed Martin and Chas Chandler respectively.

Harold Perrineau, Matt Ryan, Angélica Celaya and Charles Halford as Manny, John Constantine, Zed Martin and Chas Chandler respectively.

Though the show is based on a comic book line, it’s not a direct port to the screen. John’s backstory in the show is from an arc that happened early in the Hellblazer run, but the detective’s introduction to the supernatural world happened differently in the comics and the show. Constantine opens with John in a mental hospital after a trauma from years before – the accidental casting of a young girl’s soul into Hell – finally caught up with him. The show has done a good job of building on this background with each episode while not rubbing it in the audience’s face. In these first eight episodes, John has teamed up with a number of others who were a part of that exorcism gone wrong, all of whom are dealing with the psychological damage in their own way, from drinking to drugs to joining a convent. Meanwhile, the mystery of Zed – who saw visions of John before they met and who is learning from him how to control her clairvoyant powers – is dangled tantalizingly both in front of the audience and in front of John himself, as Zed refuses to share any details about her past.

To counter such a crack team as this, the forces of evil moving against them have to be compelling and believably strong. While the show has started as a “monster of the week” type show, using the phrase “rising darkness” as a catch-all for the things going bump in the night, the individual villains don’t feel forced or out of place in this story. The only antagonist to show up more than once so far is a character named Papa Midnite, though his motives tend more toward personal gain and less toward outright evil. Papa Midnite is another character straight from the comics, and he’ll likely make more appearances in the back half of this first season. While remaining free of spoilers, it should be noted that the presumed cause of the “rising darkness” is introduced in the eighth episode, the cliffhanger episode that aired leading into the hiatus.

Michael James Shaw as Papa Midnite

Michael James Shaw as Papa Midnite

One thing that makes tv shows based on comic books fun is the connection to the source material. With such a rich and extensive history to look at, fans who have read the comics have the opportunity to speculate on what might happen next based on what they know of the characters and plotlines already. Not only that, but the linked nature the DC universe allows for other popular characters to show up unexpectedly. While we likely won’t see Batman or Superman or any of the other big names of the Justice League on the show anytime soon, there have already been some hints toward the characters Dr. Fate (his helmet was in the first episode) and Swamp Thing (mentioned in a message if you call the phone number on John’s business card). Jim Corrigan, known to DC Comics fans as the man who becomes The Spectre upon his death, showed up in episode five; his return as The Spectre was hinted at through Zed’s clairvoyant visions. While this does give a little extra treat to those in the audience who have read the comics, not recognizing these add-ins doesn’t detract from the enjoyment of the show at all.

Every show has its growing pains, but Constantine got them out of the way early. It has become a solid show that deserves more than one truncated season. With over 25 years of source material to draw from and a skilled cast to bring the characters to life, the only thing this show lacks is the dedicated fanbase and audience to keep it on the air. January 16th, the return from hiatus, will be a key night in deciding the future of this show. In the meantime, new viewers can catch up on Hulu and NBC.com. I highly recommend this show to anyone who is a fan of fantasy, science fiction, comics, horror movies or any good, character-driven dramas with witty and sarcastic humor.

Constantine stars Matt Ryan, Angélica Celaya, Charles Halford and Harold Perrineau and airs Fridays at 8/7c on NBC, at least for five more weeks.